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Annals of Marketing
Marketing a Business
Friday, 2nd March, 2012  - David Farmer

Asking for dollars, such as raising share capital is another form of marketing and one where a lot of skill is used. Some prospectuses and shareholder updates are very imaginative. These may involve claims that you will get a great return on your money plus a tax write-off. Such were the 'managed investment schemes' based around rural activities such as tree farming which were sold as year-end tax 'write-offs'.

Michael Pascoe, Sydney Morning Herald, May 22nd, 2010 reminds us of one of the best in "Great Southern crash fells expert opinions".

They also were good at churning out bumf for their investors, all sorts of stuff about how the trees were going down on the farm. But one of their best efforts at spin was a document that tried to explain why their plantations weren't meeting expectations raised in the tax deduction sale process, or, in Great Southern speak, why "the expected average yields on these Projects as a whole are expected to be at the lower end of the initial yield range".

Great Southern was good at finding excuses, why the real world turned out to be somewhat less glossy than their sales brochures, but what I particularly like is this one:

"The Australian short rotation hardwood plantation industry (particularly on mainland Australia) was still in its infancy in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Great Southern was an early entrant into the industry. While we had a reasonable basis for harvest yields at the time because we followed best practice and were supported by independent experts, they were not, in hindsight, sufficient to accurately predict harvest yields across a wide range of soil and climatic conditions. As a result, expected yields for earlier Projects are down on Prospectus estimates."

And Great Southern also wasn't much chop at forecasting woodchip prices either. Or production costs. How could they as they didn't know what they were doing, as implied by this paragraph:

"At the time of preparing the disclosure documents for each of these Projects, Great Southern had limited actual cost history available in order to estimate what the costs may be. Great Southern used the best information available at the time in order to provide an estimate of costs and these estimates were verified by an independent expert on an individual Project basis."

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9
ANNALS OF MARKETING ARCHIVE 2014
Winery Names and Naming Wine Labels

Sunday, 6th April, 2014

Trademarks, Crittendens, Koppumurra, Wrattonbully and Legal Follies - Part 1

Tuesday, 18th February, 2014

ANNALS OF MARKETING ARCHIVE 2013
Hamburgers Under the Golden Arches

Wednesday, 3rd July, 2013

The Founder of the German Retail Colossus Metro Dies, Age 89

Friday, 15th March, 2013

Cheez Doodles, Cheetos, Fast Foods and Wine

Wednesday, 27th February, 2013

ANNALS OF MARKETING ARCHIVE 2012
When Marketing is Not Needed

Monday, 19th November, 2012

Marketing Bogus Items - Assets on Balance Sheets

Thursday, 4th October, 2012

In Recognition of Eugene Ferkauf - Retail Pioneer

Thursday, 20th September, 2012

How Do You Tell Customers You are Changing the Recipe?

Monday, 13th August, 2012

The Price Tension of Supply and Demand

Thursday, 28th June, 2012

Are Heritage Wine Brands Worth Anything?

Sunday, 22nd April, 2012

Marketing a Business

Friday, 2nd March, 2012

Using Negatives and Telling the Truth - Can it Work?

Sunday, 15th January, 2012

ANNALS OF MARKETING ARCHIVE 2011
The Dream of Sales and Marketing - Making Consumers Spend

Sunday, 13th November, 2011

Turning Disaster into Triumph

Sunday, 21st August, 2011

A Question of Balance

Friday, 1st July, 2011

Marketing a Colour Change in Fish

Monday, 9th May, 2011

Marketing the Aldi Way - A Note on Theo Albrecht

Monday, 7th March, 2011

The Art of Marketing the Arts

Friday, 14th January, 2011

ANNALS OF MARKETING ARCHIVE 2010
The Deadly and Effective Comparative Marketing of Woolworths

Wednesday, 24th November, 2010

Just Being Yourself Is Good Marketing

Saturday, 9th October, 2010

Studies Show Wine Consumers Fall Into Unique Segments

Friday, 20th August, 2010

Advertising Guru Sir John Hegarty Says Wine Market is Impenetrable

Sunday, 1st August, 2010

Reclaiming Your Brand

Sunday, 4th July, 2010

Writing Job Applications

Wednesday, 19th May, 2010

Marketing - The Rules of Success

Friday, 30th April 2010

We Pay Tribute to a Marketing Legend

Tuesday, 6th April 2010

The Art of Marketing Fragrances

Wednesday, 24th March 2010

The Andre Rieu Phenomenon

Monday, 1st March, 2010

Riding the Organic Wave

Sunday, 21st February, 2010

Keeping Supply Lower Than Demand

Wednesday, 13th January, 2010

ANNALS OF MARKETING ARCHIVE 2009
Facts About Marlboro Man and Marlborough

Wednesday, 18th November, 2009

Be Very Clear About What You are Selling

Monday, 5th October, 2009

Diamonds are a Girl's Best Friend

Saturday, 12th September, 2009

Ah yes, the Art of Marketing Yourself

Thursday, 16th July, 2009

Do You Understand the Creative?

Sunday, 5th July, 2009

First Cat's Pee and Now the Taste of Cigarettes

Wednesday, 17th June, 2009

Finding the Flavour that Works

Wednesday, 10th June, 2009

Not so Easy at Fresh and Easy

Sunday, 7th June, 2009

Twittering - Where Will it Lead

Sunday, 31st May, 2009

Is This Shooting Yourself?

Sunday, 24th May, 2009

What's in the Name

Saturday, 16th May, 2009



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