Username:    Password:
Thanks for stopping by...
Rare Treat from Consulting Winemaker
























Cool Climate with Elegance and Flavour












Single Variety from the Coast













Our specialty is seafood where we take a pared down approach. Less is better. And over the last decade we have been working out how to best cook freshly gathered funghi. Then there are recipes which we have used successfully over many years. These are adaptations of recipes we have taken from books and we will give you our source. Mostly these will lead back to another book.

Our Recipes

All About Chinese Tea, Part 2
The Famous and Special Teas of China

Wednesday, 2nd March, 2011 - David Farmer

I was fortunate to spend time in China in the late 1970's and early 1980's which came about from one of the poorly thought out business ideas of my brother and I to import tea from China. What follows comes from notes I took during an extended stay in June, 1980. I believe this information will prove quite useful to those who love tea and its many types. more...

All About Chinese Tea, Part 1
Thursday, 16th July, 2009 - David Farmer

I was fortunate to spend time in China in the late 1970's and early 1980's which came about from one of the poorly thought out business ideas of my brother and I to import tea from China. What follows comes from notes I took during an extended stay in June, 1980. I believe this information will prove quite useful to those who love tea and its many types. more...

A Fish Sauce and Tony Bilson's Whiting Quenelles
Sunday, 28th June, 2009 - David Farmer

Elizabeth David

Catching and eating fish is the ultimate life's pleasure. I seldom use a sauce as the approach to fish is cook them when fresh and keep it simple. With that said for a number of years I have experimented with a recipe of the great Elizabeth David which was published in The Complete Imbiber, No. 6. (Vista Books, London, 1963). more...


- Rabbit Pie with Pine Mushrooms

Friday, 5th June, 2009



- Mark Lloyd of Coriole Talks About Olives and Oil

Friday, 28th March, 2008



- Tales about Oysters, Opening and Eating

Thursday, 6th December, 2007



- Yeast Leavened Pancakes

Thursday, 22nd February, 2007



- Peasant Mushroom Soup

Friday, May 26th, 2006



- Fish, Eggs and Steaming Bream

Wednesday, March 22nd, 2006



- Cheong Liew's Steamed Eggplant with Tomato Chilli Sauce

Tuesday, 28th February, 2006



- Time for Saucing

Friday, 24th February, 2006



- Slippery Jacks in August?

Wednesday, 17th August, 2005



- Lentilles du Puy

Friday, 5th August, 2005



- A Delightful Warm Vegetable Salad

Wednesday, 20th April 2005



- A Tasty Fish Soup

Friday, 28th January, 2005



- The French Pizza from Provence - Pissaladiere

Friday, 28th January, 2005



- Another Broad Bean Option

Wednesday, 3rd November, 2004



- A Good Recipe for Broad Beans

Saturday, 30th October, 2004



- The Collection and Smoking of Mussels

Sunday, 18th October, 2004



- Cooking East Coast Whiting

Thursday, 14th October, 2004



- A Great Yabby Recipe

Saturday, 17th October, 2004



- The Perfect Fish Batter

Friday, 8th October, 2004



- Flathead Sushi

Wednesday, 15th September, 2004



- A Classic Carp Recipe

Wednesday, 4th August, 2004


Rabbit Pie with Pine Mushrooms
Friday, 5th June, 2009 - Simon Grant


At the Vic Market today the pine mushies were $55 per kg, over the road - free. Note the slippery jack also (lots of these about actually but pines were the focus for today - you can only eat so many)


A recent visit from a distinguished wine professional was deemed significant enough to dust off an old favourite recipe and a few bottles of interest. If truth be told the re-emergence of 'wild rabbits' in some butchers was the motivation and our esteemed guest was the excuse. Rabbit Pie is one of the classic game dishes neglected by many and in recent times with good reason as the farmed bunnies available have lacked flavour.

I'm not sure what legislative changes have lead to the 'wild' version becoming available again but it appears some degree of common sense has prevailed.

The recipe was based on a magnificent pie cooked by Elva Laughton at Jasper Hill a number of years ago and enjoyed with Ron Laughton and Olivier Antoine, at the time winemaker for Chapoutier in Australia. Elva said she found the recipe in Stephanie Alexanders' tome 'The Cooks Companion' in which Stephanie describes her mother Mary as the source. I won't repeat the recipe here but urge you to read the Companion.

In short the method is to poach the rabbits with root vegetables, saving the 'stock' to make the sauce. Remove the meat from the bones and fold through the sauce and a mixture of pan fried streaky bacon, mushrooms, herbs and toasted flaked almonds. Cover with a rustic shortcrust pastry and you are away.

I would however add that the reference in Stephanie's recipe to one rabbit suggests she is using the much larger farmed variety which I would avoid and suggest buying two wild rabbits.

The recipe also calls for 'button mushrooms' which will suffice although with Autumn upon us and Pine mushrooms lurking I would take a walk and keep your eye out for these precious morsels. The step up in flavour is profound without dominating like a field mushroom may.

Oh and don't be shy with the flaked almonds, the textural interest is fabulous. A 2006 Wendouree Cabernet Malbec topped off the evening in stunning fashion.



©2017 Glug  |  Contact Us  |  Privacy Policy  |   RSS Feed
Liquor Licensing Act 1997: It is an offence to sell or supply liquor to a person under the age of 18 years, or to obtain liquor on behalf of a person under the age of 18 years.
All transactions in $AUD. This web site is operated by Glug Management Company Pty Ltd ABN: 64 116 647 780 Licence No: 51401128